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Medical Dictionary Definitions A-Z List

Medical Dictionary Definitions A - Z - «V»:

  1. Vitamin K Vitamin K
    Vitamin K: One of two naturally occurring fat-soluble vitamins (vitamin K1 and vitamin K2) needed for the clotting of blood because of an essential role in the production of prothrombin (a clotting factor). The term vitamin A may also refer to a synthetic compound that is closely related chemica...
  2. Vitamin O Vitamin O
    Vitamin O: Not a true vitamin but rather a pricey health supplement that is composed largely of salt water (plus some germanium, a trace element dangerous to health). The US Federal Trade Commission (FTC) charged the manufacturer of Vitamin O with fraud for touting it as a cure for cancer and heart...
  3. Vitamin P Vitamin P
    Vitamin P: An old name for substances now known as bioflavinoids. They are no longer considered to be vitamins by the strict definition of that word....
  4. Vitamin Q10 Vitamin Q10
    Vitamin Q10: See: Coenzyme Q10....
  5. Vitamin requirements, infant Vitamin requirements, infant
    Vitamin requirements, infant: Vitamins are organic substances that are essential in minute quantities for the proper growth, maintenance, and functioning of the baby. Vitamins must be obtained from food because the body cannot produce them. The exception is vitamin D, which can be produced by the sk...
  6. Vitamin therapy Vitamin therapy
    Vitamin therapy: The use of vitamins to prevent or cure disease. Many physicians are now recognizing the beneficial uses of anti-oxidant and other vitamins for a wide variety of conditions, often as a complementary therapy to accompany medication or other treatments. One variant on this theme, m...
  7. Vitamins Vitamins
    Vitamins: The word "vitamin" was coined in 1911 by the Warsaw-born biochemist Casimir Funk (1884-1967). At the Lister Institute in London, Funk isolated a substance that prevented nerve inflammation (neuritis) in chickens raised on a diet deficient in that substance. He named the substance "...
  8. Vitiligo Vitiligo
    Vitiligo: Pronounced vit-uh-LIE- go. A condition in which the skin turns white due to the loss of melanocytes. These cells produce melanin, the pigment that gives the skin its characteristic color. (Melanocytes also impart color to the retina of the eye and the mucous membrane tissues lining the in...
  9. Vitrectomy Vitrectomy
    Vitrectomy: Removal of the gel (called the vitreous) from within the eyeball. This may be done because it has blood and scar tissue in it that blocks sight. An eye surgeon then replaces the clouded gel with a clear fluid....
  10. Vitreous Vitreous
    Vitreous: A clear, jelly-like substance that fills the middle of the eye. Also called the vitreous humor, "humor" in medicine referring to a fluid (or semifluid) substance....
  11. Vitreous type 2 Stickler syndrome Vitreous type 2 Stickler syndrome
    Vitreous type 2 Stickler syndrome: Stickler syndrome, type II. See: Stickler syndrome....
  12. Vitreous type Stickler syndrome Vitreous type Stickler syndrome
    Vitreous type Stickler syndrome: Stickler syndrome, type I. See: Stickler syndrome....
  13. Vocal cord Vocal cord
    Vocal cord: One of two small bands of muscle within the larynx. These muscles vibrate to produce the voice. The vocal cords form a "V" inside the larynx, a 2-inch-long, tube-shaped organ in the neck: We use the larynx when we breathe, talk, or swallow. Its outer wall of cartilage forms the a...
  14. Vocal cord paralysis Vocal cord paralysis
    Vocal cord paralysis: Inability of one or both vocal folds (vocal cords) to move. The paralysis is usually due to damage to the nerves going to the vocal cords or due to damage to the brain itself. In more technical terms, vocal cord paralysis may result from lesions in the nucleus ambiguus or its s...
  15. Vocal cord, false Vocal cord, false
    Vocal cord, false: See: False vocal cord....