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Drugs and diseases reference index

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Medical Dictionary Definitions A-Z List

Medical Dictionary Definitions A - Z - «P»:

  1. Protein C Protein C
    Protein C: A vitamin K-dependent protein in plasma that enters into the cascade of biochemical events leading to the formation of a clot....
  2. Protein C deficiency Protein C deficiency
    Protein C deficiency: Protein C is a protein in plasma that enters into the cascade of biochemical events leading to the formation of a clot. Deficiency of protein C results in thrombotic (clotting) disease and excess platelets with recurrent thrombophlebitis (inflammation of the vein that occurs wh...
  3. Protein kinase A Protein kinase A
    Protein kinase A: An enzyme system that is activated by cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and that catalyzes the activity of intracellular proteins. There are two isozymes of protein kinase A, type I and type II. Also known as cAMP-dependent protein kinase and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase...
  4. Protein kinase A regulatory subunit 1-alpha Protein kinase A regulatory subunit 1-alpha
    Protein kinase A regulatory subunit 1-alpha: See: PRKAR1A....
  5. Protein malnutrition Protein malnutrition
    Protein malnutrition: Insufficient intake of nitrogen-containing food (protein) to maintain a nitrogen balance or nitrogen equilibrium. Children are particularly prone to develop protein malnutrition. To grow, children have to consume enough nitrogen-containing food (protein) to maintain a posit...
  6. Protein requirements, infant Protein requirements, infant
    Protein requirements, infant: Proteins contain different amino acids that are linked together. Proteins provide both calories and the amino acid building blocks that are necessary for proper growth. The protein in human milk provides between 10%-15% of an infant's daily caloric need. Casein and whey...
  7. Protein ZIP code Protein ZIP code
    Protein ZIP code: An informal name for a molecular cell biology system of signals or "address tags" that guide the movement of a protein within a cell. In more technical terms, protein ZIP codes* are molecular signals that direct the protein from the endoplasmic reticulum, where it is assembled, to ...
  8. Protein, acute phase Protein, acute phase
    Protein, acute phase: See: Acute-phase protein....
  9. Protein, C-reactive Protein, C-reactive
    Protein, C-reactive: See C-reactive protein....
  10. Protein, proteolipid Protein, proteolipid
    Protein, proteolipid: See: Proteolipid protein....
  11. Protein-calorie malnutrition Protein-calorie malnutrition
    Protein-calorie malnutrition: Severe deficiency of protein + inadequate caloric intake = kwashiorkor. ...
  12. Protein-losing enteropathy Protein-losing enteropathy
    Protein-losing enteropathy: A condition in which there is excessive loss of plasma protein into the intestine. Protein-losing enteropathy can be due to a number of different causes including extensive ulceration of the intestine, intestinal lymphatic blockage, gluten enteropathy, and infiltration of...
  13. Proteins Proteins
    Proteins: Large molecules composed of one or more chains of amino acids in a specific order determined by the base sequence of nucleotides in the DNA coding for the protein. Proteins are required for the structure, function, and regulation of the body's cells, tissues, and organs. Each protein has ...
  14. Proteins, acute-phase Proteins, acute-phase
    Proteins, acute-phase: See: Acute-phase protein....
  15. Proteins, G Proteins, G
    Proteins, G: These molecules have been described as "biological traffic lights." Located inside the cell, G proteins are able respond to signals outside the cell-light, smell, hormones-and translate (transduce) these signals into action within the cell. Alfred G. Gilman and Martin Rodbell sha...